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Your 110 Reload Method by camera
Soon a list of 110 cameras by make will appear here, they will link to the appropriate instructions to reload film cartridges to suit your camera.

MAKE
MODEL
METHOD
Minolta
110 Zoom SLR Mk1
A

Preparing the Cassette For Reloading
 
  • Dismantling the cassette.
    • For first timers this is best done in the light as it can be quite tricky. So you'll have to sacrifice the film. Once you are used to it, the pprocedure must be carried out in the dark.
    • Using a modeling knife (X-Acto) or scaplel, very carefully cut through the glued seams.
      • Looking from the rear of the cassette one seam runs along under the top lip. There is one down each end of the cassette and the one at the bottom runs right round the front edges of the spools.
      • Hey presto! Two cassette halves and no blood.
    • Take your time, it can be done. (Though I did manage to stab myself the first time I did it)
    • Finally, just in case you have a camera like my Minolta 110 Zoom SLR Mk1 (and probably a few other cameras out there) you will need to file a recess in the bottom half of the cartridge that lines up with the tiny little cassette sensing lever which the camera (almost) hides in the bottom film case locating channel (under the film plain towards the feed spool end of the camera) so that it doesnt get operated. If you dont, the reloaded cartridge wont allow the shutter to fire.

Film Loading for Camera Type A

  • For the reload you can use 16mm film (Perferably non or single perf) or do what I do and split 35mm film to the right size, giving you loads of choice. If you use single perf film be sure to put the perfs at the top of the film cassette as you dont need to use them. Another thing to consider is to ensure that the perfs are covered up in your enlarger, else you will have quite a considerable light leak.
  • Again for first timers, you'll need to practice this bit in the light, you will get the hang of it for you attempts in darkness, honest. just be patient.
    • Mesure the length of the film (not the paper) you just removed from the casette and note it down for future reference.
    • Hold the film about 4" (100mm) from the end of the paper backing, the other end from the take up spool.
    • Ensuring the films emulsion is away from the backing paper. I guess you also better be sure that the backing paper is the correct way round too (numbers outside) and the perfs are at the top if using perfed film.
    • Roll the backing paper and film tightly and put into the feed spool.
    • The backing paper should be fastened to the take up spool. If it is not do so bit a bit of masking tape.
    • Wind the paper round the take up spool twice and put it in the take up spool making sure the gear is visible in the slot underneath. If you cant see the gear you have the take up spool upside down.
    • Reassemble the cassette sealing all the seams with black insulating tape or similar.
  • Its now time to use your film.
    • You will find that when you have a reloaded film in the camera the wind lever will not lock when the shutter is cocked, due to there being no perfs in the film.
    • Wind on after each shot until the next number comes in to view.
    • You are now ready for the next shot.

Film Loading for Camera Type B

  • For the reload you can use 16mm film (Perferably single perf). If you use single perf film be sure to put the perfs at the bottom of the film cassette as youur camera needs to use them to cock the shutter. Another thing to consider is to ensure that the perfs are covered up in your enlarger, else you will have quite a considerable light leak.
  • Again for first timers, you'll need to practice this bit in the light, you will get the hang of it for you attempts in darkness, honest. just be patient.
    • Mesure the length of the film (not the paper) you just removed from the casette and note it down for future reference.
    • Hold the film about 4" (100mm) from the end of the paper backing, the other end from the take up spool.
    • Ensuring the films emulsion is away from the backing paper. I guess you also better be sure that the backing paper is the correct way round too (numbers outside) and the perfs are at the bottom.
    • Roll the backing paper and film tightly and put into the feed spool.
    • The backing paper should be fastened to the take up spool. If it is not do so bit a bit of masking tape.
    • Wind the paper round the take up spool twice and put it in the take up spool making sure the gear is visible in the slot underneath. If you cant see the gear you have the take up spool upside down.
    • Reassemble the cassette sealing all the seams with black insulating tape or similar.
  • Its now time to use your film.
    • As the perfs on 110 film are an inch apart and those on 16mm film are 8mm apart, you will have a problem advancing the film. The problem is that the perf will cause the film to cock and lock every 8mm, leading to overlapping shots.
    • After each shot, put the lens cap on or totally cover the objective lens. Now wind the film on 3 times, firing the shutter each time. On the fourth advance do not fire off the shutter as you are now at the next frame.
    • You are now ready for the next shot.
    •  I do not recommend using the frame numbers as anything other than a guide, as after the first few shots they will start to get out of sync due to the fact that you are winding on farther that the standard film setting each time.
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